Skip directly to content

Malden | Melrose | Medford | Winchester | Woburn | Burlington | Lexington | Waltham | Newton

Welcome to Boston Greenbelt Walk

Welcome to the Boston Greenbelt Walk

Somehow, Saturday, May 17th turned out to be a brilliantly nice day for a long walk! All that rain stopped as if we willed it so. Congratulations to the 40+ individuals (and 1 dog) for joining us in the inaugural Boston Greebelt Walk.

We're gathering information on who walked and how far right now. If you walked, you should be receiving an email survey in the next couple days. If you do not receive an email, check back here for instructions. It is possible we may have missed you or did not accurately capture your information. Your response to the survey email is important to help shape and improve this event. The survey also provides information needed to send you a personalized "dog tag" honoring your accomplishment, regardless of the number of miles you walked.

Thanks to all from Paul, David, Laurel and Rick for participating.


The inaugural Boston Greenbelt Walk, a one-day, 30-mile walk largely in parks from Oak Grove Station in Malden to Riverside Station in Newton took place on May 17, 2014. 

The walk is a coordinated effort organized by many local and regional trail coordinators, the transportation planning group of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), and the long-distance walking organization, FreeWalkers.

The Boston Greenbelt Trail is an MAPC proposed approximately 90 mi walking trail circling Boston.  The trail would connect between Salem and Quincy inside Rt 128, connecting numerous large and small parks and open spaces including Lynn Woods, Breakheart Reservation, Middlesex Fells, Horn Pond, Cummings Park,  Across Lexington, the Western Greenway, and Aqueduct trails.  The Greenbelt would also serve as catalyst to preserve some of the remaining undeveloped lands in urbanized Boston as well as to improve conditions for pedestrians along and across busy roadways. The Greenbelt Walk will focus on a 30 mile segment of this corridor

The walk is planned to maximize the use of public transportation from the beginning to the end – and in between. There are options to walk a shorter section of the route, plus limited support along the way.  The walk is free in celebration of connecting all the great trails around the Greater Boston area.

 

No front page content has been created yet.